Sunday, October 28, 2007

CBOT Plaza: Agriculture and Industry - Sculptor Unknown.



CBOT Plaza: Agriculture and Industry..
Sculptor: Unknown
Location: The Chicago Board of Trade plaza
Description: Granite / 12 foot high / Five-&-half ton weight..












These staues have a very interesting story. The plaque as seen the the middle of the stautes reads..
"These two statues one symbolizing agriculture and the other industry once stood at the main entrance of the Board of Trade Building built in 1885. The statues greeted commodity traders and the public for 45 years. Thought lost forever when the buildings were demolished in 1929 to make way for the exchange's current Art Deco structure in 2005, the statues were graciously returned to their origins through the generosity and goodwill of DuPage County Forest Preserve District." .... These statues were uncovered from the Lake Preserve forest..

Some other artwork of interest at the Chicago Board of Trade Building..
# Sculptural reliefs - By Alvin Meyer.. click here..
# Ceres - By John Bradley Storrs.. click here..
# Agriculture and Industry.. Sculptor unknown.. click here..

Loop - Thompson Center [Bridgeport - by John Henry]






Bridgeport - by John Henry
1984, painted aluminium..
Location: Foyer of the Thompson Center..


 


 




Also at Thompson Center
 

Monument With Standing Beast - by Jean Dubuffet click here..



 
Illinois River Landscape - by Richard Hunt  click here..


RELATED LINKS..

Monument With Standing Beast - by Jean Dubuffet click here..
Illinois River Landscape - by Richard Hunt  click here..
Bridgeport - by John Henry..  click here..
James R Thompson Center.. click here..




Thompson Center [ Monument With Standing Beast - by Jean Dubuffet]






Monument with Standing Beast..
By Jean Dubuffet..
29-foot, abstract fiberglass sculpture, weighing 10-tons.
Location: James R Thompson Center Plaza..

Jean Dubuffet described this sculpture as a "drawing that extends into space" and hoped it would reach to the men on the streets. Jean Dubuffet felt a special affection for Chicago, home to one of his three monumental sculpture commissions in this country. Monument with Standing Beast is comprised of four elements that suggest a standing animal, a tree, a portal and an architectural form. The configuration invites viewers to enter the sculpture and echoes the dramatically open plan of the James R. Thompson Center...

Dubuffet coined the term "ART BRUT" which translates into "Raw Art" ... which he defines as art created outside the boundaries of official culture. In his words Art Brut are ... "Those works created from solitude and from pure and authentic creative impulses - where the worries of competition, acclaim and social promotion do not interfere - are, because of these very facts, more precious than the productions of professions".










Monument with Standing Beast, with Thompson center in the background.
 
Also in the Thompson Center..
 
 
 
Illinois River Landscape - by Richard Hunt  click here..

 
Bridgeport - by John Henry click here..



RELATED LINKS..

Monument With Standing Beast - by Jean Dubuffet click here..
Illinois River Landscape - by Richard Hunt  click here..
Bridgeport - by John Henry..  click here..
James R Thompson Center.. click here..

Loop [Freeform - by Richard Hunt]






Freeform - By Richard Hunt
1993/ Stainless steel, H 26 ft. x W 35 ft. x D 2 ft.
LOCATION: Exterior facade of 160 N. LaSalle St
State of Illinois Building..

The sculpture that adorns the exterior of the State of Illinois Building appears deceptively small in relation to the scale of the building. However, Freeform is actually two-and-a-half stories high and weighs three tons. The sculpture derives its title from one of Richard Hunt’s central ideas about the nature of abstract art—which is that it is freely formed. Whether made of bronze or steel, Hunt’s biomorphic forms often look as though they have been composed in an environment of low gravity. Animated by a series of curvilinear forms evocative of an active flame, Freeform, like other Hunt sculptures, seems capable of performing an infinite number of gestures, hinting at endless possibilities for its ultimate form.







RELATED LINKS..
Contemporary Sculptors of Chicago: Richard Hunt .. click here..

CBOT Fountain





Art Deco Founatin at Chicago Board of Trade bldg. Plaza..



Saturday, October 27, 2007

Daley Center Plaza



The Daley Plaza is the courtyard adjacent to the Richard J. Daley Center, which is the premier civic center of the City of Chicago in Illinois. The plaza serves more than 10,000 people a day..





The main building [Daley Center] behind the Picasso sculpture, was designed in the international architectural style by Jacques Brownson of the firm C. F. Murphy Associates and completed in 1965. At the time it was the tallest building in Chicago .

Some outstanding art pieces are:
Untitled [Known as Picasso] - by Pablo Picasso
The Eternal Flame Memorial
The Daley Plaza fountain
 "Under the Picasso", features lunchtime performances, ethnic festivals, holiday celebrations, farmers markets and more..
 



 
The marker reads..
Chicago Landmark..
Daley Center..
C.F.Murphy Associates, architect..
Pablo Picasso, sculptor..
1965, 1967 [Chicago Picasso]
This building is an exceptional example of the International Style and was Chicago's first major public building to be disigned in a modern, rather than historically-derived style. Innovative for its time are the building's eighty-seven foot spans of steel framing, it's exceptional internal spatial flexibility, and the first-ever use of self-weathering Cor-Ten steel as an exterior "skin" for a skyscraper. The monumental sculpture on the building's plaza, also fabricated of Cor-Ten steel, was designed by Pablo Picasso, one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.
Designated on November 6, 2002..
Richard M. Daley, Mayor
Commission on Chicago Landmarks..
 



Eternal Flame Memorial..
Construction finish: 1972
It was dedicated on August 22, 1972. The eternal flame is Chicago's first memorial to honor the dead from four wars, World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. The Eternal Flame Memorial at Daley Plaza is a granite slab bearing a bronze circular disk containing a natural gas flame that burns perpetually. The inscription reads as follows: Eternal flame in memory of the men and women who have served in our armed forces. Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, National Guard, Reserves and Merchant Marines. City officials created the Eternal Flame in response to veterans organization leaders' pleas for a memorial that would serve as a monument to deceased service personnel. The flame which burns continuously was on August 22, 1972 by Albina Nance, who was then President of the Illinois Gold Star Mothers, an organization of the mothers of fallen service members.
# For more, click here..






The Daley Plaza Fountain ...



Untitled [called The Picasso] - By Pablo Picasso..
Unveiled in 1967 ..

 
Map for visually impared...
 


During holiday time there is a wonderful Christmas Market in the Daley Plaza .

The main building [Daley Center] behind the Picasso sculpture, was designed in the international architectural style by Jacques Brownson of the firm C. F. Murphy Associates and completed in 1965. At the time it was the tallest building in Chicago ...

REALTED LINKS..
The Daley Plaza: click here..
Untitled [Known as Picasso] - by Pablo Picasso click here..
Eternal Flame Memorial.. click here..
Daley Plaza: Fountain click here..
Map for visually impaired.. click here..
Maquette for Picasso's Chicago [Art Institute of Chicago]..

Friday, October 26, 2007

Daley Plaza: Untitled [known as Picasso] - by Pablo Picasso..






Continued from the post on the Daley Plaza..
Untitled - Known as The Picasso..
By Pablo Picasso..
Unveiled: 1967..
50 feet tall and weighs 162 tons...
Made of Corrosive Tensile ["Cor-Ten"] steel..
Location: Richard J. Daley Civic Center Plaza, 50 W. Washington St.
The sculpture isa gift by the artist Pablo Picasso to the people of Chicago...




The first monumental modern sculpture to be placed in the Loop is this sculpture, now called the "Picasso". It was unveiled in the Civic Center Plaza on August 15, 1967. The artist, Pablo Picasso left it untitled, but Chicagoans named it after the artist, calling it the "Picasso”.
This sculpture was initially greeted with lots of controversies. At the time of its installation in 1967, the abstract design, the non-traditional materials and huge scale were all subject of scorn and ridicule ... Art scholars have suggested that the statue is either a portrait of Picasso's wife at the time or his Afghan dog from different angles. Some even interpret it as a horse, a baboon or a Viking Ship.
However, this gift from the artist Picasso, to the people of Chicago, has over time become an icon of the city and a source of civic pride. While opinions of the sculpture’s subject matter vary, it is acknowledged as a monumental achievement in Cubism.



The sculpture is made of Corrosive Tensile ["Cor-Ten"] steel. The steel used in the construction of the sculpture is the same as used for the office building behind it [Civic Center /Richard J. Daley Center].... The steel is designed to form a protective coating of iron oxide (rust) which protects the substrate from further corrosion ... Over time the sculpture and the building has developed the same patina, so it looks like a natural part of the landscape...
Picasso died on April 8, 1973.. before ever visiting the United States to see the completion of his design. Following Picasso's death, the Mayor and members of the City Council in the council meeting on May 9, 1973, publicly paid tribute to the famous artist with a resolution which read, in part, "Pablo Picasso became a permanent part of Chicago, forever tied to the city he admired but never saw, in a country he never visited, on August 15, 1967. It was on that day that the Picasso sculpture in the Civic Center Plaza was unveiled; it has become a part of Chicago, and so has its creator Picasso."

Picasso, who refused to accept payment for his work, designed a 42-inch model of the sculpture that he presented as a "gift to the people of Chicago." The actual sculpture, however, was manufactured by United States Steel Corporation in Gary, Indiana, where it was entirely pre-assembled, then disassembled, and subsequently shipped to the Daley Center to be reassembled in its final form. The steel that was utilized for the exterior of the Daley Center was also used for the Picasso sculpture, and, over time, developed the same patina.

The main building behind the Picasso sculpture, is the Richard J. Daley Center. It is the premier civic center of the City of Chicago in Illinois... consisting mostly of courtrooms and county offices. The Cook County Law Library and County Sheriff's office also reside here. It was designed in the international architectural style by Jacques Brownson of the firm C. F. Murphy Associates and completed in 1965. At the time it was the tallest building in Chicago..






Also check out the maquette for Picasso's Chicago at the Art Institute of Chicago, click here..


REALTED LINKS..
The Daley Plaza: click here..
Untitled [Known as Picasso] - by Pablo Picasso click here..
Eternal Flame Memorial.. click here..
Daley Plaza: Fountain click here..
Map for visually impaired.. click here..
Maquette for Picasso's Chicago [Art Institute of Chicago]..

Daley Plaza: Eternal Flame Memorial..





Continued from the post on the Daley Plaza..
Eternal Flame Memorial..
Construction finish: 1972
"This is the heart of Chicago and I know the heart of Chicago is with us today."
With those words, Mayor Richard J. Daley dedicated an eternal flame to the Daley Center Plaza. When it was dedicated on August 22, 1972, the eternal flame was Chicago's first memorial to honor the dead from four wars, World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War.

The Eternal Flame Memorial at Daley Plaza is a granite slab bearing a bronze circular disk containing a natural gas flame that burns perpetually. The inscription reads as follows: Eternal flame in memory of the men and women who have served in our armed forces. Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, National Guard, Reserves and Merchant Marines.

City officials created the Eternal Flame in response to veterans organization leaders' pleas for a memorial that would serve as a monument to deceased service personnel. The flame which burns continuously was lit on August 22, 1972 by Albina Nance, who was then President of the Illinois Gold Star Mothers, an organization of the mothers of fallen service members.






REALTED LINKS..
The Daley Plaza: click here..
Untitled [Known as Picasso] - by Pablo Picasso click here..
Eternal Flame Memorial.. click here..
Daley Plaza: Fountain click here..
Map for visually impaired.. click here..
Maquette for Picasso's Chicago [Art Institute of Chicago]..