Thursday, December 6, 2007

"12151791"







"12151791" - by Amy Larimer and Peter Bernheim ...
Location: McCormick Tribune Freedom Museum ...

The sculpture is named after the date the First Amendment was ratified. The two-story piece is made up of 800 cascading steel plates ... and each of these plates is inscribed with quotes of individuals who shaped the history of our freedom ... These hovering metal pieces are supported by a series of structural chords and each chord represents a segment of time. So the sculpture "12151791" is a suspended timeline, a chronicle of individuals' contribution to decades of democracy and freedom ...

This piece was selected from 700 entries made ... in an international juried art competetion held in the year 2005.




Click on the image for enlarged view ...

Nathan Hale - by Bela Lyon Pratt



Nathan Hale..
Sculptor: Bela Lyon Pratt [1935]
Location: Michigan Avenue Nathan Hale Court.

His famous lines ..
" I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country" ..

Nathan Hale [1755-1775] was a 21-year-old American Revolution era spy... he disguised as a Dutch schoolteacher, and attempted to infiltrate New York’s British ranks to gather intelligence on the enemy’s Long Island military installations. The young man was captured, however, on the night of September 21, 1776 and hanged for treason the next morning on a gallows ...




Words inscribed at the base of the sculpture ..
"I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country" ..

RELATED LINK:
# Tribune Tower

Festival Season is here ...



click on the image for enlarged view ...

It's nice to see festival decorations all around ...
I'm not too sure what this structure is called ... Its in the Equitable Plaza, south of Tribune Tower ...

Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Pioneer Court [ Moose - by Joan Kearney]



Moose - by John Kearney
Installed: 2003 ...
Description: Welded Steel Sculpture ... Chrome bumpers ...
8'9" X 4' X 9' ...
Location: Pioneer Court ... south of Chicago Tribune building ..




It is a part of artwork from recycled automobile parts ...
Mr Kearney has been creating art from chrome bumpers since 1970's and has many works of arts on permanent display across Chicago. As a sailor in World War-II .  Mr Kearney learned welding to do underwater repairs of Naval vessels.




Another of John Kearney's creation with automobile parts is the "Tin Man" in the Oz Park, as shown below ...



Tin Man - by  John Kearney
Installed: 1995 / Car bumpers
Location: Oz Park ...



Clydesdale Horse - by John Kearney
1992 / Car bumpers on concrete base.
Location: Bridgeport At Center

Oz Park






Oz Park ...
Location: 2021 N. Burling St, Chicago, IL 60614 ...
Oz park is in the Lincoln Park area ... The idea being a place for children to enjoy the theme park with the "Wizard of Oz" theme ...







The Tin Man ..
The Tin Man is made of used automobile parts ...
# Another sculpture by the same artist John Kearney with automobile parts titled the Moose can be found in the Pioneer Court ... click here ...
# A few more sculptures with used automobile parts can be found in the Grant Park ... Like the "Lilies" by Dessa Kirk, "Glass Bench" by Ted Garner and "Hedgerow" by Lucy Slivinski ... click here ...



The Scarecrow ..



 

Dorothy and Toto ...




The Oz Park ... [Information from it's official website]
Although the area surrounding Oz Park is considered prime real estate today, in the late 1950s it was in sub-standard condition. In the 1960s, the Lincoln Park Conservation Association approached the City of Chicago in efforts to improve the community, and the neighborhood was soon designated as the Lincoln Park Urban Renewal Area. The urban renewal plan identified a 13 acre-site for a new park, and in 1974, the Chicago Park District acquired the land.

In 1976, the park was officially named Oz Park in honor of Lyman Frank Baum [1856-1919], the author of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Baum settled in Chicago in 1891 several miles west of what is now the park. Having begun writing children's books at age 41, Baum wrote more than 60 books, including 14 Oz books, by the end of his life. In 1939, the production of an MGM movie, The Wizard of Oz, immortalized Baum's classic work of fiction ...


In the early 1990s, the Oz Park Advisory Council and the Lincoln Park Chamber of Commerce commissioned artist John Kearney to create a sculpture "Tin Man" Later more additions were made..
- Tin Man" installed in October 1995 ...
- The Cowardly Lion, installed in May 2001
- The Scarecrow, installed June 2005.
- Dorothy & Toto, installed in 2007 ...

Other elements which celebrate Oz Park's theme, includes:
# The Emerald Garden .. and ..
# Dorothy's Playlot.



Dorothy's Playlot.

Dorothy's Playlot gets the name from its donor, Dorothy Melamerson, a retired local school teacher whose savings have paid for a number of park improvements in the Lincoln Park neighborhood. It is filled with play equipment for the little ones to climb, swing, and run .. .. whereas in the Emerald Garden, families can enjoy a leisurely afternoon among the beautiful flowers.


REF: Oz Park official website .. click here ...

Dawn Shadow ... Public Art???



click on the image for enlarged view ...

Dawn Shadow by Louise Nevelson
Location: 200 W. Madison Ave ..

Few days back I went to take photographs of this sculpture Dawn Shadow ... I approached the person on the reception desk to take permission to take it's photographs ... I was told that photography is not allowed!!!!

hmmm... I fail to understand why photography of a huge sculpture, which is said to be a part of Chicago "Public" Art collection is not allowed???? I think more and more people should be aware of these art pieces if they are part of public art collection of the city of Chicago.

Check out ... Louise Nevelson (Dawn Shadows) ...

Tuesday, December 4, 2007

Riverwalk Gateway - by Ellen Lanyon




Riverwalk Gateway ...
Artist: Ellen Lanyon
Architect: The trellised, cast-concrete walkway, is designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
Description: Ceramic mural tiles..
Location: Under Lakeshore Drive, south bank of Chicago River..



Ellen Lanyon's ceramic murals offers pedestrians a pictorial narrative of the city's history as it is entwined to the Chicago River. In 1998, the painter Ellen Lanyon won a competition to create ceramic murals for the two 127-foot-long walls which marks the Chicago Riverwalk Gateway..

There are in all 28 ceramic panels..
14 on each side of the north and south walls..
Of these 14 panels on each side of the wall..
- 3 on each side [east and west side] of the wall are introductory...
making for total 6 introductory panels on each side of the wall..
- 8 central panles which are narratives..
So of the total 28 panels..
- 12 are introductory..
- 16 are narratives..

" The 16 full-scale narrative panels each document an episode in Chicago's history. Beginning on the west side of the walkway, the first panel presents the arrival of Europeans by canoe at the portage between the Chicago River and Lake Michigan. Black-and-white text, presenting information such as event descriptions and dates, appears in the borders of each section, helping to carry the story along.... The river remains the primary theme of the narrative because of its centrality to Chicago's development. Bridges and maps make frequent appearances in these murals, recording the changes in the city's landscape and the evolution of bridge designs to accommodate the city's expanding needs. Lanyon incorporates images of plants and wildlife in each piece, recalling motifs she has used throughout her career... "









Above Images..
First two imges: Introductory panels..
Bottom two images: Narrative panels..
For details of the north and south wall panels..


# Riverwalk Gateway-II [North wall].. click here..
Beginning on the west side of the north wall of the walkway..
Image 1: Introductory panel
Image 2: Introductory panel..
Image 3: Exploration..
Image 4: Fort Dearborn..
Image 5: The New City..
Image 6: The float bridge..
Image 7: Three swing bridges..
Image 8: The Great Fire...
Image 9: The Three Bridges..
Image 10: The Columbian Exposition..
Image 11: Introductory panel
Image 12: Introductory panel..

# Riverwalk Gateway -III [South Wall].. click here..
Beginning on the east side of the south wall of the walkway..
Image 1: Introductory panel
Image 2: Introductory panel
Image 3: Reversal of Chicago River..
Image 4: The Michigan Avenue Bridge ..
Image 5: Grant Park and Burnham Park..
Image 6: A Century of Progress..
Image 7: The South Branch..
Image 8:The North Branch...
Image 9: The Main Branch..
Image 10: The Riverwalk..
Image 11: Introductory panel..
Image 12: Introductory panel..


Y-Symbol at Riverwalk Gateway..
For more on..
# Y-symbol, click here..
# Y-symbol at Riverwalk Gateway.. click here..

Riverwalk Gateway - II [North Wall] - by Ellen Lanyon





Continued from the above post: Riverwalk Gateway.. click here..
Riverwalk Gateway ...
Artist: Ellen Lanyon

Architect: The trellised, cast-concrete walkway, is designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
Description: Ceramic mural tiles..
Location: Under Lakeshore Drive, south bank of Chicago River..

There are twelve panels on each side of the wall..
This post is on the north wall of the Riverwalk Gateway..


























There are twelve panels on each side of the wall..
This post is on the north wall of the Riverwalk Gateway..
Beginning on the west side of the north wall of the walkway..
Image 1: Introductory panel
Image 2: Introductory panel..
Image 3: Exploration..
Image 4: Fort Dearborn..
Image 5: The New City..
Image 6: The float bridge..
Image 7: Three swing bridges..
Image 8: The Great Fire...
Image 9: The Three Bridges..
Image 10: The Columbian Exposition..
Image 11: Introductory panel
Image 12: Introductory panel