Tuesday, March 2, 2010

CBOT: Sculptural Reliefs [By Alvin Meyer]





Chicago Board of Trade Building..
Architects: Holabird & Root
Sculptural Reliefs: Alvin Meyer
Completed: 1930
The building was designated a Chicago Landmark on May 4, 1977.
It is also a National Historic Landmark..

Artwork in the Chicago Board of Trade [CBOT] building inludes:
- Sculptures in it's plaza [Agriculture and Industry click here..]..
- Sculptural reliefs by Alvin Meyer..
- Ceres, by John Bradley Storrs.. click here..

The sculptural relief works on the building's facade facing the LaSalle Street [North side].. In the center, is a 13 ft diameter clock and on each side of the clock is a hooded figure, an Egyptian holding grain and a Native American holding corn. The relief work is by Alvin Meyer, one time a leader of Holabird & Root's sculpture department.

There are similar figures at the uppermost corners of the central tower..

Faces [bull??] protruding from the limestone cladding on the building's facade..



Logo of Chicago Board of Trade..

The CBOT logo inculcated in the building clock..

Ceres..
Sculptor: John Bradley Storrs
Description: Aluminium, 32-foot tall..
Ceres, the Roman goddess of grain and the patron saint of corn traders.
# For more.. click here..

Agriculture and Industry..
Sculptor: Unknown
Location: The Chicago Board of Trade plaza
Description: Granite / 12 foot high / Five-&-half ton weight..
# For more.. click here..

Sculptural Relief by Alvin Meyer..
Alvin Meyer, who made the sculptural reliefs for the Chicago Board of Trade building also made reliefs for the Riverside Plaza.. It traces the history of printing..
# For more on.. click here..

# For more on Architectural Sculptures.. click here..

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Alvin Meyer was not just the sculptor behind the relief work found on the CBOT Building, but was also the creator of the free-standing "Statue of Industry" and "Statue of Agriculture" found in the building's plaza. Indeed, as you mention in your blog, he was the head of Holabird & Root's architectural sculpture department at the time of the building's creation. As such, he was, personally, behind each and every choice of artwork found on, in, and around the high rise. This included all that interesting symbolism found throughout the building's fa├žade, not to mention personally choosing the John Stoor statue that stands looking over us all.

Jyoti said...

Thanks for writing and you have some wonderful piece of information. But I have got to ask, who are you, and where does these information come from?
You can comment here or email me..

jyoti@lensimpressions.net

Dean Meyer said...

Hello, I'd love to hear more information of Alvin Meyer. I am a third generation ancestor of him. Please, email me with anything you know. I'd love to learn a bit about him.

Thank you.

Anonymous said...

While the style is a tad different from his usual Art Deco flair, Alvin Meyer also sculpted Industry and Agriculture. (He was also a central figure behind the architectural development of the "plaza" as a way for people to enjoy art while taking their leisure outside of the working environment.)